Staying Active Over 40 Is Key – Overweight Muscular vs. Underweight Low Muscle Mass

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Is My Weight Gain Caused by Slowed Metabolism While Aging?

Metabolism is the process through which your body converts food into energy. Even when at rest, you need some energy to aid in breathing, repairing cells, and circulating blood.

You’ve probably heard that when you hit 40, it’s downhill for your weight. The inexplicable force on the metabolism rate begins to grind slower each year from 30 years onwards. Is slowed metabolism the cause of weight gain at old age?

Here’s what you should know: studies show that the rate of metabolism slowdown in older age is rather minimal. Additionally, weight gain in midlife is not due to slower metabolism. The reality is that, as we age, we get less active.

Regardless of whether you have a slow or fast metabolic rate, our bodies are synchronized to store excess energy in fat cells. Taking in more calories with reduced body activity (older people are lesser active) expands your body for weight gain.

Generally, you don’t have any control over your body’s metabolism. However, to keep a healthy weight, you should reduce and control your calorie intake. Additionally, you need to be more active. Engage in regular physical activity to burn your calories. In fact, people with fast metabolism are more active.

Metabolic Adaptation: The Undiagnosed Epidemic

The weight loss formula is simple: burn calories as much as you can consume, and you will probably drop pounds in no time. Metabolism is the energy-producing force that runs faster than Usain Bolt!

Metabolic adaptation is the slowing of the metabolism rate despite several efforts exerted for one to lose weight. This slowing of metabolism causes people to regain weight if they fail to keep up with high levels of exercise and restrictions of major calorie intake.

Metabolic adaptation is a biological response process to starvation. For example, in the availability of plentiful food, the body doesn’t see it necessary to store calories in the form of fat. However, in times of famine, the body’s metabolism process uses the minimum number of calories to maintain the biological homeostasis. The rest is stored as fat for later use to avoid starvation.

Ultimately, metabolic adaptation is one part of dieting and metabolism. Weight loss or weight gain depend on the collection of metabolic adaptation traits.

The takeaway: your body metabolism will adapt to weight loss; however, that doesn’t mean that you will gain it all back or stop shedding pounds. Getting enough sleep, upgrading cardio workouts, and managing stress will help you in overcoming metabolic adaptation.

Overweight and Muscular Rather Than Thin and With Low Muscle Mass

“There are two certainties in life: taxes and death.” However, people should also add loss of muscle mass to that list.

Don’t get worried about sarcopenia. It’s an age-related muscle loss condition, a natural part of aging. Remember that you should rather become overweight and muscular than thin and low in muscle weight.

The reason being, low muscle weight means that you’ve less mobility and greater weakness. These two results of low muscle weight increase your risk of falls and fractures. Research by the American Society showed that people with sarcopenia are 2.3 times more prone to low-trauma fractures from a slight fall (broken hip, leg, arm, collarbone or wrist).

However, losing your muscle mass doesn’t mean that it’s all gone forever. You can still increase your muscle mass despite the aging consequences. It takes work, planning and dedication to rebuild the muscles and maintain them.

To lose weight and also maintain your muscles mass at the same time, you need the right type of exercise and the appropriate diet. Muscle mass is the biggest contributor to resting metabolism. It helps in burning more calories than fat.

Being underweight presents more health concerns as you age than being overweight with muscle suprisingly!

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